What is McArdle’s Disease?

What is McArdle’s Disease?

McArdle’s Disease is a metabolic disease affecting skeletal muscle. It is also known as Type V glycogen storage disease.

An Overview of McArdle’s Disease

McArdle’s disease is a rare muscle disease affecting approximately 1 in 100,000 people. Because their muscles cannot properly metabolize energy, individuals with McArdle’s disease may experience fatigue and failure during strenuous activities like jogging, swimming or even walking. These episodes can result in painful cramping injuries that require medical attention. McArdle’s disease is an inherited condition, and is caused by a missing or non-functioning enzyme needed to make glucose for energy. While this condition imposes significant physical limitations, it is not directly life-threatening and with the proper precautions and lifestyle management, people who have McArdle’s Disease can live healthy, active lives.

About This Website

This website, mcardlesdisease.org, has been created to increase awareness of this rare condition. This site contains two types of content: general information and links about McArdle’s disease, and McArdle’s disease blog articles from individuals with the disease describing subjective experiences with the condition.

407 thoughts on “What is McArdle’s Disease?

  1. Frederick Gassmann

    I don’t know where to start. I am a very private person who spent his life and career taking care of others so now I am looking for assistance with Mc Ardles syndrome. Psychiatry and counseling was my occupation.

    In 2003, 4:00 Pm. I started backpacking alone in the Adirondack,’s on a trail I knew well. I developed classic rhabdomyolisis symptoms (unknown condition for me at the time.} I had to ditch my pack and make an emergency retreat of 3 miles to my car at the trailhead. The condition worsened as I progressed so I had to physically move my legs with my hands and arms. Dragged myself through the woods. At sunset I was still on the trail and exhausted. I lay on the logging road with the few items I had and sheltered through rain and cold temperatures. I put on my rain gear and and exhaled warm air into the the front of my jacket to reuse body heat expelled. Checked vitals every 15 and made it to firs light. Again I continued down the logging road to a bridge where I could get water and it was where 2 trails met giving me the best opportunity to be found by a fellow hiker. I was exhausted and running out of options. 11:30 Am. a fellow backpacker found me and I requested medical assistance. He gave me his water and trail mix and hiked back to his car and had to drive 5-7 miles to get a cell phone connection. He returned an hour later with EMT’s who carried me out. 16 days at Glen Falls Hospital and no kidney damage. I was told it was Rhabdomyolisis brought on by heat and strenuous exercise. Unfortunately that wasn’t the case. I have spent the last 14 years without a correct diagnosis until this year.
    I am thankful to the fellow backpacker who assisted me in an hour of need, I don’t know his name and wish I could have known him. I am thankful to Dr. Matthew Preslar of Highland Hospital who had the curiosity and the wisdom to consult an endocrinologist who had knowledge of the medical condition. I am thankful that strangers can use a safe site as this one to share information and experience with others in the hope that it may be helpful. I wish I had something of value to offer but I can only offer honesty and encouragement at this time.
    I lack the ability to maintain homeostasis or simply body temperature regulation, unable to tolerate heat. I am looking to see what adaptive clothing that might assist with that. If nothing I will work on my own solution to the problem and share what I can regarding that.
    Please remember that MCardles syndrome and related conditions are similar to metabolic disorders and each case is unique. Being a good “Self Advocate” is an excellent place to start. Talking and communicating with strangers, family members, Doctors requires courage but most people don’t know how courageous they really are until they step outside their comfort zone and try. My experience is that people are far more courageous than they think they are. Encourage each other and communicate on a regular basis.

    Thank you for your valuable time and I look forward to learning more from this site.

    F. Gssmann (Rick)

    Reply
    1. Wayne Biggerstaff

      Man…
      What an eye opener.
      I was diagnosed at 38 with Mcardle’s.
      One thing you said (which I need to do more research) is an intolerance (for me it’s huge) to temperature changes on the higher end. I can be somewhere and if I get “hot” it becomes almost intolerable to me.
      This is the first I’ve heard someone else mention this…
      Thanks for sharing and good luck with it all…
      WB

      Reply
      1. Site Administrator Post author

        Hello Wayne. I’ve heard a few people mention other discomfort or tolerance thresholds they feel may be related to McArdle’s. Over on the Facebook Group, Andrew and others have surely fielded this question so if you haven’t done so already you might ping the group. Best of luck,

        Reply
    1. Site Administrator Post author

      Hi Jim, yes still active. Just took a long hiatus which is now ending. Look forward to more signs of life!

      Reply
  2. Natalie

    Hi I was wondering if all people with McArdles have a high level of liver enzymes and if anything can be done about it because it’s damaging the liver. ?

    Reply
  3. Mark LaForest

    My son Devon had McArdles Disease and epilepsy. When he would go into a seizure, the violent shaking would cause severe rhabdomyolyse shutting down his kidneys and releasing large amounts of potassium into his blood stream. A little over three years ago he had a seizure – in conjunction with McArdles Disease caused his heart to stop. Thankfully at the time, EMS was able to restart his heart and after long rehab, my son was able to get back to a normal life style. Last November, Devon had another seizure, unfortunately, this time he didn’t make it and died. People with McArdles Disease need to be aware that sudden strenuous activity can be very dangerous. If my son didn’t have both epilepsy and McArdles, I’m sure he would be with us today. One observation I had while my son was alive is that the more weight (fat) he had, he could do strenuous activity much easier. As he got older, he found it more and more difficult to put on and maintain weight.

    Reply
  4. Shelly

    My 13 year old nephew was just diagnosed with this, he is a star athlete and was told he may have to quit sports. I know there are so many things out there that are worse than this but it is heart wrenching to know he has to give up his passions. I believe he is in the beginning of this disease, any words of advise or tips would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance

    Reply
  5. hala

    @Tammy

    Tammy,
    I searched for McArdle’s group on FB and found it to be a construction company in the UK. can you post a direct link to the group?

    Reply
  6. Tammy

    @Matthew
    Matthew if you have a face book account do a search for McArdle’s group. I just found them and it’s all people like us who suffer with McArdle’s! Hope to see you there!

    Reply
  7. jessie

    @Erin
    I have Mc ardles disease since I was 18. I still continue to run, but have always had stomach problems. I had my gallbladder taken out almost a year ago and that has seemed to help me a little bit.. but i have to be picky of when i eat and what i eat. I have had a stent put in my kidney when i was 18 and have had multiple surgeries… I am wondering if any one has found anything that helps before or after excersing?

    Reply
  8. Matthew

    Hello my name is Matt I am 42 years old male and have never met someone with McArdles. I would like meet someone who shares with me this same condition. Really just to have conversation with someone who understands.I never knew what was wrong until I was 28 years of age.Hope to hear from you. Thanks Matt

    Reply
  9. Jim Ottesen

    @Erin
    Erin,
    Have you been tested for diabetes, allergy to gluten or others?
    What does your ck run and are there any “highs” in you complete
    blood chemical profile and urine tests? What is your job and what
    stress risks do you take. Have you been diagnosed as having McArdle’s, when, where and by what means? “Excess” fun with McArdle’s can be very serious, or fatal. Be careful. Jim

    Reply
  10. Nicole

    Mia :
    I am curious if any other McArdle’s people have stomach/digestion problems? I know that they say that McArdle’s only effects the skeletal muscles, but after having had several conversations with other McArdle’s people I have found a common theme in stomach issues; pain after eating, a feeling of having ate something “heavy” like lead after eating even a small meal, stomach pain when standing for periods of time, I am beginning to wonder if it is ONLY the skeletal muscles. Any one here having similar problems? Also, does eating chocolate (or sugar, for me it’s m&m’s) help with the stomach pain? I am curious if there is a secondary problem involving the stomach. I have had upper G.I’s done with no bad results.
    Thanks,
    -Mia-

    I actually have always as long as I can remember have had terrible stomach issues!! I am going next week to get my gallbladder out and a procedure where they wrap the stomach around the esophagus…I have a Hiatal Hernia acid reflux and gurd…all bad issues…hoping the surgury helps…my email is nickkiwick@yahoo.com if anyone would like to ask questions please put mcardles in the subject line. I have dealt with many issues. I’ve had 4 children one at home with a mid-wife, I work full time and I exersize…

    Reply
  11. Erin

    @ The specialist I saw says low carb and high protein. Harder than it sounds but definitely doable. I have so much more pain when I eat things like pizza, pasta, and potatoes. I was dx when I was 18 in 2004 and work and go to school both full time. I understand the issue of sitting in pain, and noticed recently that it’s worse in the front row as I have to twist and turn my head more frequently. It’s frustrating and gets me down at times but I’m stubborn as hell and still insist on pushing my limits every now and then when the fun could possibly outweigh the pain. Would like to chat with you more if you’re interested.

    Reply
  12. growth hormone

    What a terrible disease.

    @June It’s sad to see doctors treat you like that, it’s not like you’re going to the doctor just for fun.

    Sad to see this disease hit the young so hard.

    Reply
  13. Nicole

    @Jan Weekley make sure he does not run and cramp those muscles it’s very unfortunate, but he can’t play sports like this unless it’s just for the fun of it and he is able to rest between bases. I know I am 39 and was born with McArdle’s. Sad thing is I also have the ‘athletic’ type of muscle tissue, but am not able to utilize it in the way I would like to. I work full time and have four kids two of which are 5 and 2yrs. I have been hospitalized about 6 x for rhabdomylosis. One count of my cpk got very high I almost died. My urine was the color of pepsi and I was preg with my third baby. Good thing I got aggressive treatment, but it’s not worth him playing sports if it’s gonna jeapordize his health.

    Reply
  14. Reena

    I’m Reena and was diagnosed with McArdle’s disease when I turned 24. I just woke up not being able to move. It freaked me out. My feet were swelling and I had to take some medicines. At first, I didn’t accept it. Now, I managed to cope up with the disease. It isn’t that bad.

    Reply
  15. adam

    My name is adam and I was diagnosed about 3 years ago. I am now 24. I have nevered talked to anyone else with mcardles and I would like too. My email address is adam_scruggs@hotmail.com. some one shoot me a message sometime I would love to talk.

    Reply
  16. beryl desmond

    I was diagnosed by exercise.
    There is no other 100% way of doing it. I was made to cycle on an exercise bike at two minute intervals I was blood tested, at 6 mins I fell off in a tetanic spasm, I was ill and sick for days.
    I have had countless biopsies, bits of my muscle has been sent all over the world, the nuleus in the cells was on the outside instead of inside and the cells had become elongated not roundish.
    That was in 1979 England.
    In 2005 I was blood tested and a biopsy taken which showed within normal limits, I think this was because I had learned to pace myself, also there was no exercise test involved.
    I know I have macardles I have proof of this, but some doctors just do not know what to look for.
    I am fortunate it is not the lipids enzyme I am deficient in but I am 60 % deficient in phosphorylase. sorry if this is not spelt right.
    A good way to describe it is this.
    A METABOLIC ABNORMALITY OF THE MITOCHONDRIA.
    Yes it is geting worse as I get older, who knows where it leads?

    Reply
  17. beryl desmond

    I was diagnosed at the age of 31 with macardles, I had, had four children by then, however it was not having the children that was difficult (all born naturally) it was the tiring situation of being a mother, I was so tired I was suicidal.
    I have suffered kidney failure just once, whilst looking after my children, it is doing the day to day living, looking after children that is the worst part, sometimes I was in such pain and so tired I could not give my best.
    This is what drove me to finding out what was wrong with me.
    I am now 65, I have terrible leg pains and bad ciculation, is this also a symptom, constant cramp in legs and feet.

    Reply
  18. Christy

    I remember walking to school when I was young…i would force myself to walk until my leg muscles would cramp up, I would get faint and sometimes even get sick. By the time I got to school I had cooled down and just tolerated the stiff muscles. I watched others in my family go through the same thing. In highschool the teacher treated me like I was lazy and got to the point that she sent me out to the track before the others so I could get done before the end of class. Symptoms: Muscles tightened or ‘hardened’ to the point I couldn’t lift my leg or arm or stand up. After the stiffness started to subside I would try to ‘walk it off’ or slowly work the area to loosen it up. The muscle would be sore for days but motrin or pain killer made it a little better! The best way to diagnose and monitor the disease is with CPK blood tests. @Chris

    Reply
  19. Christy

    @Alex
    5 of 9 kids in my family have McArdles. I am the second oldest and I am now 48. McArdles is painful,no doubt! Here are some things that have helped me: Stay active. Get on an easy exersize program and work your way up. Keep your body weight balanced. If I know I am going to walk a distance I try to raise my sugar levels with a diet soda or even a candy bar. i know that doesn’t sound healthy but it keeps me from cramping up so fast. Don’t carry backpacks on your back! Use a pullcart anytime you can. Stop and rest often to give your body time to find some energy. Have your blood checked often so you don’t do other damage to your body with high enzyme levels. A healthy lifestyle really does help. It will never go away but it makes less bad days. Hang in there!

    Reply
  20. Christy

    @Pam
    Yes you can have babies with McArdle’s! I did not know I had McArdle’s until I was in my teens. I had 3 babies in my early 20s. The first one was by natural delivery, the second one was by C section and the third one I went through all the labor and ended with another C section due to baby complications. Yes it was exhausting during the labor but the labor did the work. Do what your doctor reccommends but I will tell you that you can do it! Now, if we talk about walking a city block, that is a struggle!

    Reply
  21. John

    I have also been diagnosed with McArdle’s disease. I have a question though. I didn’t find out what was wrong with me, or why I felt so much different than anyone else until I had already gotten a bachelors in a field that requires the use of my muscles. When I was younger and working on my bachelors my problems didn’t manifest themselves as much as they have now that I’m older. I was unable to perform at my job, so I was let go (before I knew what was wrong with me) I now bounce from job to job that requires manual labor. I can’t find any desk jobs, and I was wondering if anyone knew if it is common for people with McArdle’s disease to go on unemployment in the US. I’ve tried to find jobs where I didn’t have to lift things for 3 years now, and I’m so depressed that I keep getting minimum wage jobs, and I keep tearing my muscles trying to lift things I should be able to lift. If anyone has any kind of supportive comments or answers, please e-mail me, simmonstrumpet@gmail.com Thanks in advance.

    Reply
  22. roy

    I was diagnosed with McArdle’s disease in 1979 after a near drowning at age 24. (My parents remember me always complianing about walking and being tired at age 5 and beyond.) However since then I have been doing my own research because doctors seem to know little about what my issues are. now having read about McArdle’s and Tauri’s disease, I’m pretty sure my ailment is Tauri’s. However, many of my symptoms go towards both names. I tire easily, but get a second wind in just a few minutes. My muscles ache often from exercise and I’ve weakened over the years. I used to be a firefighter and could carry 150 pounds up several flights of stairs, now I can barely get up over a curb. I was in renal failure, had my share of EMG’s, and a biopsy which was totally necrotic at the time – 1979. Doctors seem to be unable to help and yet MDA doesn’t seem to have any research programs going either. Exercise aggravates the condition.

    Reply
  23. Vic T

    Hi 17 years old
    and yes i was diagnosed with McArdle's disease syndrome as well when i was 7. i was wondering if anyone could answer this question. Is it safe for a me to even take protein supplements and doing work outs. I want to try to build some muscle mass. but i dont want to damage my muscles for the future. can anyone give me advice??

    Reply
  24. Daniel Hoy

    Hello everyone, my name is Daniel Hoy and I too have McArdle's Disease. I was diagnosed in 1998 and I also have an older brother who has McArdle's as well. My parents have five children and my brother and I were the only ones to get McArdle's, which is great because I wouldn't wish this disease on anyone. I'm always trying to find out if there are any new treatments or secrets on how to cope or maintain better with my McArdle's. Unfortunately I always find the same info, THERE IS NO TREATMENT!!! I have found a doctor who is willing to really look into our disorder and try to help.

    Reply
  25. Mia

    I am curious if any other McArdle's people have stomach/digestion problems? I know that they say that McArdle's only effects the skeletal muscles, but after having had several conversations with other McArdle's people I have found a common theme in stomach issues; pain after eating, a feeling of having ate something "heavy" like lead after eating even a small meal, stomach pain when standing for periods of time, I am beginning to wonder if it is ONLY the skeletal muscles. Any one here having similar problems? Also, does eating chocolate (or sugar, for me it's m&m's) help with the stomach pain? I am curious if there is a secondary problem involving the stomach. I have had upper G.I's done with no bad results.
    Thanks,
    -Mia-

    Reply
  26. Rachel

    Hello,

    I was diagnosed with McArdle's at 21 and I have gone through kidney failure at 17 and a fasciotomy on my left forearm at 22. I am now 25 in my 2nd trimester of my 1st pregnancy and I am bombarded by the opinions of my family that I shouldn't go through natural childbirth and a C-section would be safer. I on the other hand disagree. I would love to hear from some mother's who have been in my same situation and prefer some successful stories of natural childbirth!!

    Thank you,
    Rachel

    Reply
    1. christi

      Rachel, I have had to vaginal deliveries. The first I had an epidural, and I was great, I felt like myself right after the delivery. However, with my second she came so quickly that I didn't have time for an epidural and subsequently it was natural. Delivery was horrible, too taxing for me physcically. My CPK continued to rise for several days. I couln't hardly walk due to the exertion in my legs. The difficult thing is, all deliveries are different. I recently read that it wasn't good for someone with McArdles to have a C-section. Good luck in your decision.
      Christi

      Reply
    2. Anne-Maria Reinders

      Hallo Anne-Maria,
      Ik ben 2 keer zwanger geweest en heb nu 2 dochters van 14 en 16 jaar.
      De eerste zwangerschap heb ik in het ziekenhuis gelegen vanwege groeiachterstand van baby en keizersnede bevalling gehad.
      De tweede dochter had ook groeiachterstand en ik ben met pillen naar huis gegaan en heb thuis veel gerust.
      Maar dit keer was het een normale bevalling.
      De oudste dochter woog 1900 gram en de jongste dochter woog 2400 gram.
      Dus blijf goed onder controle.
      succes
      groeten Anne-Maria Reinders Nederland

      Reply
    3. Mia

      Rachel,

      I had a C-section. It was fantastic! It wasn't nearly as scary as I thought it was going to be. In fact, I made it into a bigger deal than it was. I have fairly severe McArdle's, I can't even make it across the parking lot of a grocery store without having to stop many times. I didn't want to risk the types of muscle contractions and potential complications with a natural birth. The night before my C-section I had severe pre-labor pains and I know that had I tried natural birth there would have been problems. The contractions where absolutely terrible and made even worse by the McArdle's. After the contractions stopped my muscles were still cramped up from them. It was an excruciating experience. I have spoken to other mothers with GSD V who went through natural birth before they knew that they had GSD V and regretted not knowing and being able to opt for a C-section.

      I now highly recommend a C-section. I really wanted, at the start, to do natural birth but I had to just come to accept that I'm not like other women, and I didn't want not to be able to take care of my daughter because I went into kidney failure or because my muscles had been damaged by natural birth. My daughter came out healthy, pink, and screaming. I don't regret having a c-section at all. My daughter is now 14 months old. If you really want to be a stickler for something, breastfeed your baby, even though it can be tremendously difficult!

      Reply
    4. penny bayley

      Hi Rachel,

      I have McArdles disease and have had 2 natural child births. My send baby weighed 11lbs! Everything was fine. Hope it goes well.
      Penny

      Reply
    5. Sharon

      I never felt better than when I was pregnant. Don't know what it was but it was a terrific experience. I had natural childbirth with no problems AT ALL.

      Reply
  27. Pam

    I am 69 years old with McArdles disease. I have been extremely tired, nauseous, and headaches for 6 weeks, along with a general feeling of weakness. The doctor has taken many blood tests and says everything looks good but admits he knows nothing about McArdles disease. Has anyone ever experienced similar symptoms?

    Reply
    1. ray

      Hi pam i too have the smae symptoms but also have not heard of this disease until I did some research. he doc thinks I have lupus but im not so sure. Also all of my work ups blood etc,, scans and mri's have deemed normal,, which is really strange to me. I take pred and plaquneil which seems to help me during the day..

      Reply
  28. Alex

    Hello Alex i was diagnosed with Mcardles at age 19 in 2007. I first posted here almost 3 years ago. I went to the hospital with extremely high CPK levels was hospitalized for 2 weeks and had to do dialysis for about 2 weeks. They did a muscle biopsy and diagnosed me with this. I always new growing up their was something wrong. My muscles would rip so easily just walking up stairs or holding light weights for a couple seconds. I feel the worst in my upper neck and back and i feel like nothing works. Even sitting in a chair is horrible for me I think because your body uses muscles to hold your back and neck up-right. Mcardles is driving me insane. I see some posts on here of questions people have that i cannot answer. Mcardles doesnt spread. If you were diagnosed with Mcardles you knew something was wrong your whole life, you cant think you have it cause you would KNOW something is wrong. If i hold a weight in a bicep curl position for a couple seconds my bicep will be ripped and my arm will be stuck in a L position for the day. A couple sit-ups like back in high school would leave me hunched over for the rest of the day because of ripped abdominal muscles. Even if someone gets me laughing too hard stomach muscles rip. My leg muscles are also a problem walking up steps. Thinking I could have it worse is what gets me threw the day. Most of these examples ive learned to deal with, but I cannot stand the pain in my neck and upper back anymore. The worse thing about it is not being able to sit in a chair. The only time I can enjoy my body not hurting as bad is laying down but I work full time and go to school full time. Siting threw school is 10X harder to concentrate when I constantly have to massage my neck muscles. When i am massaging my neck muscles my forearm muscles will rip, sometimes writing with a pencil will cause my forearm to rip. SO if you think you have Mcardles I would say you dont because you would definentaly know their is something wrong. I have a couple questions on what the newest treatment plans are. I haven't had time to check in with a doctor but i do get my labs checked alot to see where my levels are at. I was prescribed flexeril and darvocets 100s which i do not take either of them because they don't help. What seems to help you? Also whats alanine about?

    Reply
  29. Alex

    Hello im Alex i was diagnosed with Mcardles at age 19 in 2007. I first posted here almost 3years ago. I went to the hospital with extremely high CPK levels was hospitalized for 2 weeks and had to do dialysis for about 2 weeks. They did a muscle biopsy and diagnosed me with this. I always new growing up their was something wrong. My muscles would rip so easily just walking up stairs or holding light weights for a couple seconds. I feel the worst in my upper neck and back and i feel like nothing works. Even sitting in a chair is horrible for me I think because your body uses muscles to hold your back and neck up-right. Mcardles is driving me insane. I see some posts on here of questions people have that i cannot answer. Mcardles doesnt spread. If you were diagnosed with Mcardles you knew something was wrong your whole life, you cant think you have it cause you would KNOW something is wrong. If i hold a weight in a bicep curl position for a couple seconds my bicep will be ripped and my arm will be stuck in a L position for the day. A couple sit-ups like back in high school would leave me hunched over for the rest of the day because of ripped abdominal muscles. Even if someone gets me laughing too hard stomach muscles rip. My leg muscles are also a problem walking up steps. Thinking I could have it worse is what gets me threw the day. Most of these examples ive learned to deal with, but I cannot stand the pain in my neck and upper back anymore. The worse thing about it is not being able to sit in a chair. The only time I can enjoy my body not hurting as bad is laying down but I work full time and go to school full time. Siting threw school is 10X harder to concentrate when I constantly have to massage my neck muscles. When i am massaging my neck muscles my forearm muscles will rip, sometimes writing with a pencil will cause my forearm to rip. SO if you think you have Mcardles I would say you dont because you would definentaly know their is something wrong. I have a couple questions on what the newest treatment plans are. I haven't had time to check in with a doctor but i do get my labs checked alot to see where my levels are at. I was prescribed flexeril and darvocets 100s which i do not take either of them because they don't help. What seems to help you?

    Reply
  30. Chris

    I am a New Zealander still struggling to figure out what I have. Originally diagnosed with Ankylosing Spondylitis, I then went on to the one of fibromyalgia. Now, something else has decided to appear – but then I think I always had it….I mean that I cheered when I ‘won’ a race at school. I was second to last! I have had high liver emzymes but not as high as many here assuming the tests are the same. I am about to test again. I experience attacks if I throw myself into something strenuous and cramp up badly for days.

    I have had the coloured urine, but not so severe. But to be honest I was really was not looking for it – you don’t do you.

    The Ankylosing Spondylitis was ‘resolved’ by not eating starch. I consider the fibro an indication of a metabolic disease but – which one. I worked my way through my illness in my typical stubborn style….

    I took magnesium [has B6, and Manganese with it] for the cramps, niacinamide and MSM for the cramps too and they work. However, as things slowly deteriorated in other ways [looks like late onset] I added fish oil.

    A breakthrough has come with an understanding that 2 x carnitine 500mg and vitamin B6 might work. I had big B6 deficiency symptoms.

    The carnitine fixed the insomnia and I could relax. However, I do have to eat sweet things at regular intervals and watch the exercise levels. I am tired of complaining to the Doctor – so I am reluctant to go. He is learning from me I think!!! I have always had the ‘second wind’. It is the getting out of the chair bit that got me, until I took the B6. The constant mild excercise is essential and a bit hard to keep up, without motivation.

    I will say so far that the assumption that it is McArdles, is proving fortuous, , as I am better now than I have been in years. No stamina – but better.

    Reply

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